Residual Stress Summit 2017

Speakers


Short Course -- Hole-Drilling Residual Stress Measurements

Gary Schajer teaches and does residual stress research in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. His first hole-drilling publication was recognized by the 1981 Best Paper Award of the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. Since then, Gary Schajer has done extensive research on residual stress measurements, and has published numerous papers and book chapters. He is a member of ASTM committee E28-13 on residual stress measurement, and has been responsible for three major revisions of ASTM E837 Standard Test Method for Hole-Drilling Residual Stress Measurements.

Theo Rickert is a Research and Development Engineer with American Stress Technologies / Stresstech Group, a maker of residual stress measurement instruments. He has a particular interest in residual stress measurements using ESPI with the hole-drilling method. His prior work was in the specialty steel industry. Dr Rickert has a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Materials Science and a Dr.-Ing. degree in Metallurgy and Materials, both from RWTH Aachen, Germany.


RS in Engineering and Certification

Chuck Babish, a Senior Level executive, is the Technical Adviser, Aircraft Structural Integrity, Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, WrightPatterson Air Force Base, Ohio. He serves as the recognized Air Force authority in aircraft structural integrity and service life. His technical responsibility includes oversight of the U.S. Air Force’s Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP), which is executed continuously over the entire life cycle of all Air Force aircraft.

Michael Gorelik is the Chief Scientist for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance at the Federal Aviation Administration. He has over 25 years of experience in the areas of fracture mechanics, fatigue, damage tolerance and probabilistic methods. He successfully applied this expertise to design and certification of aerospace products, fleet management and risk assessment, root cause analysis, definition of manufacturing process controls, and coordination of R&D programs and consortia. At the FAA, Dr. Gorelik supports various certification programs, development of advisory materials and rule making activities across the Agency, evaluation of new industry technologies and research. Prior to joining the FAA, Dr. Gorelik was an Engineering Fellow at Honeywell Aerospace working in the areas of life prediction and durability assessment of safety-critical components. He holds a Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics from the University of Illinois, and an MBA from the W. P. Carey School of Business (ASU).

Dale Ball has worked in the area of aircraft structural durability and damage tolerance for the past 35 years. He has been directly involved with fatigue spectrum generation methods and software development, fatigue crack initiation and growth analysis methods and software development, and with structural integrity requirements development and certification for air vehicles. Dale's current research interests include the maturation of structural health monitoring technologies for aircraft sustainment, and the modeling of residual stresses and non-linear material response and the impacts that they have on fatigue and fatigue crack growth. Dr. Ball holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering, an MS in Engineering Mechanics and a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering, and is currently a Senior Fellow in the area of fatigue, fracture and sustainment methods development and test at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Fort Worth Texas, where he has been for the past 30 years.

Bob Pilarczyk spent over a decade in the A-10 ASIP office supporting fleet challenges, leading analysis methods, and mentoring new engineers. Over the last five years he served as the lead for the A-10 structural integrity and analysis team, which was responsible for solving unusual and difficult strength, fatigue, fracture, corrosion, and design challenges facing the A-10 fleet. Recently, Bob joined the Hill Engineering team, bringing his experience to support structural integrity needs of other weapon systems and industries. His recent focus areas include structural integrity support for the T-38 and A-10 as well as supporting the implementation of engineered residual stress in the USAF.

Michael Prime received a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley in 1994. He has worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a Research and Development Engineer for over 18 years, where he has received four Distinguished Performance Awards and six Defense Program Awards of Excellence. He has worked on nonlinear vibrations, structural health monitoring, residual stress measurement, shock physics, and material failure at high strain rates. He was named an ASME Fellow in 2010, and received the A.J. Durelli award from the Society for Experimental Mechanics in 2012. In 2000, he invented and later patented the contour method for measuring residual stress, which is used worldwide.


Residual Stress in Structural Materials

Tony Yao got his Ph.D. degree in Shanghai Jiaotong University in China and then worked as a post-doc in Portland State University. He is currently a research metallurgist in Weber Metals Inc., working in the area of process metallurgy and simulation on forgings and heat treating processes of aluminum and titanium alloys. Prior to that, Tony worked in Caterpillar Simulation Center to do simulation on casting and heat treating processes.

T. J. Spradlin is a Research Engineer for the Structures Technology Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory. After finishing his B.S. and M.S. degrees at the University of Tulsa in 2005 and 2007, respectively, TJ went on to complete a Ph.D. in Engineering at Wright State University in 2011. Dr. Spradlin’s research interests include simulation based residual stress prediction techniques, fatigue and fracture of metallic aircraft structure, and probabilistic approaches to both.

Adrian T. DeWald is the President of Hill Engineering, a global leader in improving the performance of materials – delivering expertise in residual stress measurement, mechanical design, material testing, structural integrity, and service life extension. Adrian received a Ph.D. from the University of California in Mechanical Engineering.


Industrial Applications 1

Matt Watkins joined Engineering Software Research & Development (ESRD) in 2009. He holds a M.S. degree in Aerospace Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, where he teaches finite element analysis as an adjunct instructor, and he is also a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Missouri. As Project Manager at ESRD he coordinates and leads the ESRD engineering services team in funded projects and research in areas such as fracture mechanics, residual stress, distortion of metallic components, and the development of simplified software tools which allow non-experts to use advanced analysis methods in safe and reliable frameworks.

Conal Murray is a Research Staff Member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, where his scientific activities focus on the micromechanics of semiconductor structures and quantum computing. Before joining IBM, he received a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Northwestern University in 2000. He has authored or co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications, 3 book chapters, and holds over 60 patents. He is a member of the American Physical Society, TMS, Sigma Xi and the International Centre of Diffraction Data.

John Bouchard is a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and holds a Chair in Materials for Energy at the Open University (OU) in the UK. He leads the Materials Engineering Group, within the School of Engineering and Innovation. He is Director of the EDF High Temperature Centre at the OU and StressMap, a business unit providing residual stress measurement services to industry. Professor Bouchard is currently developing an International Stress Engineering Centre at Harwell (Oxfordshire) in collaboration with Coventry University and the ISIS Facility. His personal research interests include measurement, modelling and management of residual stress, fracture mechanics and the high temperature performance of structural systems. Prior to joining the OU in 2008 his career in the nuclear industry centred on supporting structural integrity safety cases for nuclear systems, and leading strategic research projects addressing advanced fracture (R6 Procedure) and high temperature (R5 Procedure) assessment technologies.


Residual Stress Measurement

Lyndon Edwards is currently National Director, Australian Generation IV International Forum Research at the Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in which capacity he led Australia’s recent application for membership of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and its subsequent relevant research activities. Prior to his present position he was Head of the Institute of Materials Engineering at ANSTO for 10 years. Previously, as UK academic he held a Personal Chair in Structural Integrity at the Open University, UK and is currently Adjunct Professor of Materials Engineering at Monash University in Australia. Prof Edwards has a long-standing international reputation in structural integrity particularly of nuclear, aerospace and defence related materials. He has over 250 publications of which the majority are on Residual Stress and has been one of the leading proponents of engineering stress measurement using neutron diffraction.

Michael Fitzpatrick is Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Engineering, Environment and Computing) for the Coventry University Group; and he also holds the Lloyd’s Register Foundation Chair of Structural Integrity and Systems Performance. His research centres on the application of advanced experimental methods to materials engineering applications, particularly in the nuclear power and aerospace industries. His current interests include the study of laser shock peening for life enhancement of aerospace and marine structures, and components in nuclear power plant. He also works on the development of novel structural concepts such as bonded crack retarders for improving airframe structural integrity. He has been a user of the international neutron and synchrotron X-ray facilities for over 20 years, for the study of internal stress and damage development in metallic materials and components. He has published over 200 research papers and has successfully supervised 30 PhD students to completion. He was the 2009 recipient of the Lidstone Medal of The Welding Institute. Michael is a Non-Executive Director of Diamond Light Source Ltd, the UK’s synchrotron X-ray facility.

I. Cevdet Noyan is Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Columbia University, New York, where he works on x-ray and neutron diffraction and mechanical response of crystalline materials. Prof. Noyan served as Research Staff Member and Research Manager at the IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Laboratory until 2004, where he conducted and directed research on chip packaging, reliability of microelectronic interconnection structures and x-ray microdiffraction. Noyan received the Adjunct Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching from Columbia University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science in 1993. He received two IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Awards and an IBM Research Division Award for research and development of computer and packaging structures, on which topics he is the co-author of more than twenty patents. He is co-editor of Advances in X-Ray Analysis and a Fellow of American Physical Society.

Brent Volk is a Research Materials Engineer in the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory. He is a member of the Polymer Matrix Composites Materials and Processing Research Team. His research interests are in the computational modeling of polymer matrix composites, including processing and multiphysics interactions, as well as in multifunctional materials. Before joining AFRL in 2014, he completed his Ph.D. at Texas A&M University on shape memory polymers and was subsequently a National Research Council Fellow at AFRL.

Gary Schajer teaches and does residual stress research in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. His first hole-drilling publication was recognized by the 1981 Best Paper Award of the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. Since then, Gary Schajer has done extensive research on residual stress measurements, and has published numerous papers and book chapters. He is a member of ASTM committee E28-13 on residual stress measurement, and has been responsible for three major revisions of ASTM E837 Standard Test Method for Hole-Drilling Residual Stress Measurements.

Armand Beaudoin presently serves as the Assistant Director for the InSitµ Center at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source and is Professor Emeritus Department of Mechanical Science & Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before moving to academia, he worked in the aluminum industry for 17 years. He worked directly with production facilities in developing hot rolling practices for optimizing properties of aluminum alloys. Presently, Professor Beaudoin develops and applies multiscale models to study the plastic deformation of polycrystalline metals and geologic materials. Current research centers on applying high-energy (synchrotron) x-ray diffraction studies to validation of models for metal deformation and fracture.


Residual Stress in Additive Manufacturing 1

Paul Shade is a Materials Research Engineer for the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate. He specializes in the development and application of novel experimental techniques to elucidate linkages between micro- and macro-scale behavior in structural materials. This has included micro-scale mechanical testing and materials characterization to investigate the micromechanical behavior of metals and alloys, techniques for high spatial resolution measurement of elastic properties, and high energy synchrotron x-ray based methods to nondestructively characterize materials during thermo-mechanical testing in order to further develop/validate microstructure-based performance prediction models. He has active collaborations with an extensive list of government, academic, and industrial partners.

Jared Heigel has been studying manufacturing processes and the impact they have on the thermal and mechanical history of the processed material since 2005. He has primarily used thermographic techniques to measure the heat generated from the high strain and strain rates experienced during metal cutting, and to measure the melt pool and the cooling rates of the rapidly solidifying material behind it during laser based additive manufacturing processes. In additive manufacturing, the rapid solidification and complex thermal history have a significant impact on the material microstructure, residual stress, and part distortion. In addition to experimental investigations, Jarred has developed thermo-mechanical finite element models of additive processes to gain further insight into the process and to enable the prediction of part distortion. Jarred earned a Ph.D. from Penn State in mechanical engineering in 2015.

Maria Strantza is currently working at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on a novel approach for the understanding and control of residual stresses in additively manufactured metals. She is working with in-situ, quasi in-situ and ex-situ residual stress measurements by means of non-destructive diffraction techniques and destructive techniques. Her current investigation will provide fundamental data for theoretical model predictions and the design optimization of additively manufactured structures.


Industrial Applications 2

Ann Marie Phillips is the Project Engineer/Project Manager for the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Qualification Program residual stress, mechanical properties, and flow testing projects. Ms. Phillips has over 25 years of project engineering and management experience at the Idaho National Laboratory, as well as 8 years of experience as a mechanical engineer at Hewlett Packard Company. She has led a variety of projects ranging from environmental cleanup to decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, as well as performing engineering design and analysis. Ms. Phillips has been awarded seven patents for her research in environmental management technologies. She received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1984.

Tony Parker is a Consultant in Education, Training and Research, and also a Visiting Professor at the University of Cranfield, England (Defence Academy of the UK). He is also Dean of Faculty in three British Universities. His principal research interests are in fracture, fatigue and residual stress in relation to safe-life design of military equipment. Tony Parker has a doctorate in fracture and fatigue of aircraft structures from the University of Southampton, England and was a commissioned officer in the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy.

Theo Rickert is a Research and Development Engineer with American Stress Technologies / Stresstech Group, a maker of residual stress measurement instruments. He has a particular interest in residual stress measurements using ESPI with the hole-drilling method. His prior work was in the specialty steel industry. Dr Rickert has a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Materials Science and a Dr.-Ing. degree in Metallurgy and Materials, both from RWTH Aachen, Germany.


Residual Stress in Additive Manufacturing 2

Michael Stender received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder in Mechanical Engineering. In 2015, he joined Sandia National Laboratories where he currently is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff in the Multiphysics Modeling and Simulation Department.

Thomas Watkins is the Leader of the Scattering and Thermophysics Group as well as a Senior Research Staff Member in the Materials Science and Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He graduated with a B.S. in Ceramic Engineering from Alfred University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Ceramic Science from the Pennsylvania State University. He joined ORNL in 1992. His research interests include residual stresses, x-ray and neutron diffraction and mechanical properties of materials, particularly related to the understanding of the relationships between the macroscopic and crystallographic responses of materials during loading. He has co-authored more than 60 journal publications and is professionally affiliated with the International Centre for Diffraction Data, American Ceramic Society, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) and ASTM International.

Bjørn Clausen has been the instrument scientist for the engineering instrument (SMARTS) at the Lujan Center since 2002. He has more than two decades of experience working within the fields of engineering related neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements of residual stresses and material properties. Dr. Clausen got his Ph.D in Materials Science/Mechanical Engineering from Risø National Laboratory/Technical University of Denmark in 1997 and continued with Postdoc positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory and California Institute of Technology before becoming a staff member at the Lujan Center (LANL) in 2002.

E. A. Payzant

Nathan Levkulich is a Research Scientist at UES, Inc. He is currently a graduate student at Wright State University. His research interests are measuring residual stress evolution in metal additive manufacturing (AM) and advanced materials characterization.


Posters

Horst Bruennet graduated as Dipl.-Ing. in Sensor and Precision Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences in Saarbruecken in 2002. In 2004 he finished the master program in Sensor Systems Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences in Karlsruhe. From 2004 to 2008, he worked for the Diesel Systems division of the Robert-Bosch GmbH in Hamburg, Germany where he led the Center of Competence for Autofrettage and Strength Improvement. Between 2009 and 2013 he was a scientific assistant at the institute of Production Engineering of the Saarland University and finished his doctoral thesis in 2014 on residual stress optimized product and process chain design. Since 2013 he is the Division Manager of the technical development of Schaller Automation in Blieskastel. In addition, he still works as a lecturer and research consultant for the Institute of Production Engineering of the Saarland University.

Jason Wild obtained his BSc in Materials Science & Engineering at The University of Manchester in 2015 before continuing his studies onto postgraduate research. He started his PhD in 2015 as part of the EPSRC Materials for Demanding Environments Centre for Doctoral Training programme. Jason's research interests are in PEEK polymers, as well as residual stress measurement.

Chenxing Li is a Ph.D. student at the Harbin Institute of Technology, China, where he is in the second year of his research studies on residual stresses in aluminum alloy components. He previously graduated with a Bachelor degree from the same institution, where his Bachelor degree thesis was entitled "A Study of Orange Peel Defect in Aluminium Alloy with CPFEM".

Renan Ribeiro is a PhD Candidate in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering PhD program at UC Davis. He received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Federal University of Uberlandia in Brazil. Renan's research focuses on residual stress and its impact on fatigue and fracture behavior, notably using the eigenstrain method. His first project involved the development of a benchmark fracture mechanics solution considering residual stress and stress intensity factor using an eigenstrainmodel. His second project involved the use of eigenstrain models to predict residual stress arising from cold expansion of fastener holes. Renan's current projects involve determining the accuracy of residual stress and fatigue crack growth predictions based on eigenstrain models for complex parts removed from quenched aluminum bars.

Chris D'Elia is a PhD student at the University of California, Davis in the Materials Performance Lab studying Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He previously received a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Christopher is an avid bicyclist, car enthusiast and fly fisher. He has fabricated numerous bicycle frame-building tools along with three complete steel bicycle frames. As a car enthusiast, Christopher enjoys driving and restoring his 1960s Alfa Romeos. He also enjoys backpacking and fly fishing in the Sierras with hand tied flies.

Jong-hyoung Kim is a Ph.D candidate student at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University. His major research fields are analysis of mechanical behaviour of materials, evaluation of mechanical properties, failure analysis and integrity assessment.

Sung Ki Choi is a Ph.D candidate student at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University. His major research field is evaluating reliability in macro/nano-scale structures based on mechanical properties of materials.

Niall O’Dowd graduated with his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2017 from the Rochester Institute of Technology and is now a Structural Engineering Ph.D. Student at the University of California, San Diego. He is presenting on behalf of Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research consists of structural health monitoring, imaging techniques and optics.

Mitchell Olson is a Research Engineer at Hill Engineering, LLC. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis in 2015. His research interests include advancements in mechanical residual stress measurement methods and uncertainty estimation. He has previously worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a Graduate Student Research Assistant and received his B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2009.

Sanin Zulic received his Master of Science degree in the University of Belgrade, School of Electrical Engineering. He used to work in the non-destructive testing field in the industry. Currently employed in HiLASE Center, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Science, as a junior researcher, Ph.D. student, where he is working on the development of the Laser Shock Peening process and the in-situ detection of laser-induced stress waves in metals during the LSP process.


Equipment Demonstrations

Toshikazu Suzuki is Vice President of Pulstec USA, Inc. He is responsible for sales of Pulstec XRD equipment to North and South American customers. He has more than 20 years of experience providing technical service and support to varied industry customers. He has particular background expertise and knowledge in electronics and controls.

Theo Rickert is a Research and Development Engineer with American Stress Technologies / Stresstech Group, a maker of residual stress measurement instruments. He has a particular interest in residual stress measurements using ESPI with the hole-drilling method. His prior work was in the specialty steel industry. Dr Rickert has a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Materials Science and a Dr.-Ing. degree in Metallurgy and Materials, both from RWTH Aachen, Germany.

Alessio Benincasa has worked at SINT Technology since 2004, after graduating in Mechanical Engineering in Florence, Italy. His particular areas of interest include the production and development of the instruments produced by the company, including the automatic equipment for measuring residual stresses by hole drilling Restan-MTS3000. He has made over 1,000 residual stress measurements and elaborations, mainly by hole drilling and ring core methods, and he is certified at the 3rd level (the highest level in Italy) in strain gage tests and measurements. He also gives training lessons on strain gage installation and measurements and on residual stresses.

Adrian Dewald is the President of Hill Engineering, a global leader in improving the performance of materials – delivering expertise in residual stress measurement, mechanical design, material testing, structural integrity, and service life extension. Adrian received a Ph.D. from the University of California in Mechanical Engineering.

Mike Brauss is the President of Proto Manufacturing. He has over 25 years experience in the research, design, development and application development of X-ray diffraction (XRD) systems. With over thirty publications and multiple patents, his inventions and developments include: automated residual stress mapping; iXRD portable stress analysis system, (world’s smallest and fastest system); iXRD combo systems; and LXRD laboratory stress system and gantry robot systems. Mr. Brauss also pioneered practical field usage of XRD stress analysis, in-line production applications and fully automated applications. He also serves on the ASTM E28.13 residual stress subcommittee.

James Harter is a Senior Consultant for LexTech, Inc., current developer of the crack growth life prediction program, AFGROW. He has over 35 years of experience in the areas of Structural Analysis, Fatigue, and Fracture Mechanics beginning at Northrop Corporation where he worked primarily on the F-20 and B-2 programs. In 1983, he was hired by Sikorsky Aircraft to work in the Structures Technology Group where he developed life analysis methods to support DTA for the HH-60 and H-53. He then spent 30 years with the Air Force Research Laboratory where he developed AFGROW and served as Director of the Fatigue and Fracture Laboratory in the Flight Dynamics Directorate from 1991-1998.

 
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